Delhi Agreement Jk

The Indian Independence Act of 1947 laid the legal basis for the British withdrawal from the subcontinent and guaranteed partition. On June 3, 1947, a status quo agreement was drawn up by the British-Indian government to ensure that "all administrative arrangements between the British Crown and the Spring State be maintained without amendment between the signatory states (India and Pakistan) and the State until new agreements are reached." But in the 12 days following the signing of the status quo agreement with Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan wrote a warning to The Maharaja on 24 August: "For Maharaja of Kashmir, it is time for him to make his choice and vote for Pakistan. If Kashmir does not arrive in Pakistan, the greatest difficulties will inevitably arise. The accession instrument signed by the Maharaja, with its own single clauses, was seen as a quasi-temporary agreement between J-K and India, but just like other princely states, namely Hyderabad and Travancore, they had their own clauses, which were inserted into their accession instruments, which were watered down when the time came and that these princely states were entirely part of India`s constitution. , as well as the J-K membership clauses. In this sense, the current revocation of Article 370 is exactly under the constitution of India and it is high time that Kashmiris accepted that they are legitimate citizens of India and that they deny the external influences that indoctrinate them and strive to lead peaceful and prosperous lives. The entire Indian nation will support them in this regard. Meanwhile, Pakistan interpreted the fact that the J-K silence agreements with India were pending as meaning that the state would eventually join Pakistan. The Delhi Agreement was a trilateral agreement signed on 28 August 1973 between India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. and only ratified by India and Pakistan. [1] It allowed the repatriation of prisoners of war and interned officials held in the three countries after Bangladesh`s war of liberation in 1971. The agreement was criticized because Pakistan did not repatriate Urdu spokesmen to Bangladesh and failed to bring to justice 195 high-ranking military personnel accused of being admitted to the war.

[2] Among the PoW, 195 Pakistani military officers detained in India have been identified as the main suspects in war crimes. Pakistan insisted that they be released as one of its main demands. She urged several Muslim countries to refuse recognition of Bangladesh until the release of the 195 officers. [7] India preferred their repatriation to Pakistan.

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